Auld Lang Syne . Happy new year. “Auld lang syne” literally means “old long since.” Modern translations include “long long ago” or “days of long ago” or “olden days” or even “for old times’ sake.”

When I was a little girl, I never knew exactly what “Auld Lang Syne” meant. One of my most frequent, clear memories is of Guy Lombardo’s Orchestra <RIP, Guy> performing the song right before it was time for Dick Clark to drop the big ball at Times Square. Write on! XO Laurie

Put to song, it is well known around the world and often sung at midnight on New Year’s Eve to celebrate the start of the new year. The phrase, however, was made popular and became renowned because of a poem written by the Scottish poet and lyricist, Robert Burns, in 1788.

“Auld Lang Syne” begins “should auld acquaintance be forgot, and never brought to mind? Should auld acquaintance be forgot, And auld lang syne?” In other words, should old friends and old times be forgotten or should we remember long standing relationships – - old friends and/or lovers – - and the times we have shared?

In short, it is very easy to take those people closest to us for granted.  We simply assume that they will always be there. I, of course, was generally always asleep by that time <and will probably be again this year as well!>.

Do you have friendships – - or relationships – - that you have not nurtured or respected? Have you treated someone in a way that you yourself did not want to be treated? Have you been too busy in your own life and troubles to remind those closest to you how important they really are?

 

Acquaintances – - like dates – - are a dime a dozen. . Likewise, it can sometimes be heard in English-speaking countries at funerals, graduations, or as a farewell or ending to other occasions. Would you like to be updated when I write a new article? Great! Simply click the little button at the top of the page that says “subscribe” and provide your email addy. Examiner will do the rest! Thanks very much. . They color your world, support you, and snap you to your senses when you need it.

In a word: absolutely!

For old times’ sake?  Sure.  But do it because of what you feel in your heart.  . Real friends – - and a person worthy of you and your heart – - are more difficult to come by.

 

If you have answered “yes” to any of the foregoing questions, call your real friends and/or your special person as soon as possible, and take special care to remedy your responses. ? Where does this phrase come from and what does it mean?

Family notwithstanding, if it was not for my real friends and special person, I would be in a different place today and not a better place!

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FOR MORE INFO: Do you like this article? Do you have a comment, or do you have a question or suggestion for a future topic? Let me know! Feel free to leave a comment or send an email to me at iamstllunwrttn@aol.com. There is no time like the present. 

 

Everywhere you have been and everywhere you go, and all the people that you meet and befriend — any person that you come to love — shape who you are. XO

But, I digress.

The melody of “Auld Lang Syne” has been reverberating in my head since the day after Christmas as I, along with most everyone else, look forward to the new year as 2009 quickly creeps to its end. Additionally, it is still traditionally sung in Scotland at the conclusion of gatherings.

“Auld Lang Syne” is a phrase traced to certain Scottish poets, such as Robert Ayton, Allan Ramsay, and James Watson. Sadly, when we find special friends – - or even that special person – - we often do not nurture and respect them, treat them as they should be treated, or we are too busy in our own lives and troubles that we forget to remind them how important they really are to us.

I love you